07 March 2013

Computer Science Majors After Graduation

Few inventions have become as ubiquitous as the computer. We have them everywhere. In our pockets, on our desks, in our book-bags, and in our classrooms. Over the last fifty years, computers have evolved from giant thundering beasts into a symbol of humanities technological advancement. But we're not slowing down. The computer is becoming increasingly necessary in the United State's economy. There isn't a business or initiative that's separate from the computer's influence.



This should come as good news for anyone major in computer sciences. There will be a need wherever there's a large set of computers or a network. As computers are still a relatively new technology, there is still a lot of room for this industry to grow and mature. It's understandable for graduates or prospective graduates to have some tepid feelings about their job prospects. Especially considering their high unemployment rate. Yet, there's no reason to fear! This developing major still will see growth and need in the coming years.  



What do Computer Science Majors do and Where are They Wanted?



Computer science majors have a number of different possible career paths to choose from. For instance, if they so desired, graduates could become computer research scientists. They can be computer systems analysts, a designer, or a database analyst. Essentially, these careers all focus around the technology behind a computer or a network.



As could be expected, computer science majors are needed where there are a lot of computers or tasks related to them. Banks, multinational corporations, and even smaller, more locally run businesses are in demand of good computer science majors. 



What can a Computer Science Major Expect in Terms of Income and Work Environment:

What these graduates experience in the workforce will obviously depend on what specific job they enter. There are different expectations for different positions. Each will carry it's own unique environment and compensation.



Most jobs, however, pay extremely well. The demand for graduates in this developing stem field places a high importance on their skills. A systems analyst can expect to receive around $77,000 a year. Most of these individuals work in companies that revolve around system design and other similar services. However, a large percentage of them are seen in the insurance field.

On the other hand, research scientists can expect to make over $100,000 per year. They tend to work primarily for the federal government. Many choose to work in fields relating to education, however. This includes becoming a teacher themselves or performing tasks for schools.



In both cases, the environments tend to be more structured and orderly. However, many major corporations have incredible central buildings and promote less structured approaches to problems. Such a corporate headquarters can be found with Google or Yahoo. 



Job Projections:


A good job environment and a large income isn't enough to guarantee a good job. Demand needs to be present. If there isn't, then those details are merely extraneous.



Fortunately, all of the businesses in the computer science section are almost assured to expand. As mentioned earlier, computers are becoming increasingly vital to our day to day lives. The need for computer scientists are directly proportional to the need for computers.



Computer science majors can expect to see a 22% increase in the number of jobs in their field over the next decade. That's a mind boggling figure. A fifth more computer jobs today. That's over 50% higher than the expected growth in all other fields. Times are changing and the future may appear uncertain, but growth and stability in this field is a good bet to make.





This piece was composed by Donald Nickerson, a freelancer who focuses on computer software and computer gadgetry of various sorts; those interested in computer gadgetry should view the latest ipad cases from kensington.com.

0 comments:

Post a Comment